Comparing and Contrasting Buddhism and Islam

Outline

  1. Introduction
  2. Researching on Buddhism and Islamic religions was motivated by the need to understand how both beliefs differ in their values and opinions.
  3. The research paper below evaluates the similarities and differences between Islamic and Buddhist religious practices.
  4. This paper discusses the concepts of sin, salvation, death, morality, and faith extensively.
  5. The Concept of Sin
  1. The Islamic religion believes in sin, while Buddhists view transgression as ignorant.
  2. Muslims believe in God’s atonement, while Buddhists maintain that forgiveness is only possible amongst human beings.
  3. Both religions are similar in their beliefs in forgiving sins after genuine repentance.

III. Meaning and Method of Salvation

Save Time On Research and Writing
Hire a Pro to Write You a 100% Plagiarism-Free Paper.
Get My Paper
  1. Buddhists believe that liberation is a personal journey, while Islam beliefs tell that is the last stage of life where one is guaranteed of entering paradise.
  2. Both religions have similar ways of attaining salvation with the Eightfold Path of Buddha in Buddhism and the five principles of Islam living among Muslims. 
  1. Meaning of Death
  1. Both religions are similar in that they acknowledge the existence of death, which is an inevitable stage of life.
  2. Muslims uphold that after dying, one retains the physical body in readiness for resurrection, but Buddhists refutes this idea where they believe in reincarnation. 
  1. The Role of Faith
  1. Buddhists refute the existence of any supernatural being, while Muslims believe in Allah.
  2. The similarity in the faith concept is seen through a belief that a believer’s hope becomes their spiritual refuge where one is convicted and experience boosted confidence. 
  1. The Nature of Morality
  1. Both religions are similar in that they derive their moral authority from the Quran and Dharma doctrines.
  2. Both Buddhism and Islam differ in their moral obligation in upholding the right to live. 

VII. Conclusion

  1. The research paper clearly shows that both Islam and Buddhism have religious beliefs and opinions that are different and similar in various instances.
  2. Each religion has strong beliefs pertaining to sin, salvation, death, morality, and faith.
  3. Salvation is guaranteed, but not in life after death. Dying is inevitable in both faiths but takes different forms in both religions.
  4. Faith spiritual strengthening, but no supernatural being is acknowledged. Morality is strongly upheld, but differs in the sanctity of life concepts.

Comparing and Contrasting Buddhism and Islam

Introduction

Religious concepts differ significantly; hence, it explains using different approaches by various people and communities. Religious communities offer value systems and worldviews that are unacceptable by other people with different beliefs. Indeed, it becomes difficult for individuals to understand the belief systems of other communities as the inadequacy of this comprehension results in a hasty judgment that reflects significant arrogance and ignorance. Essentially, each religion defines its values and opinions differently. Considerable alterations are seen in religious scripture, doctrines, customs, practices, and rituals. Nonetheless, it is essential to note that there are some exciting similarities seen and rejoiced by different religions; thus, celebrating them is necessary (Maitreya 10). In essence, taking a closer look at the differences in religious beliefs is essential as it is through them that misunderstandings are developed, and if not remedied, small issues can lead to other bigger problems. While religion does not always initiate intense problems, looking into the major differences between beliefs is important as it is core in resolving various issues resulting from religious affiliations. Therefore, it is imperative to discuss major concepts of religion in Islam and Buddhism to evaluate the similarities and differences between the two groups of worshippers.

Save Time On Research and Writing
Hire a Pro to Write You a 100% Plagiarism-Free Paper.
Get My Paper

The Concept of Sin and Methods of Salvation

In all faiths, sin is a vital concept that substantially determines the godliness of a person. According to Muslims, all actions that do not reflect Allah’s commands are against the Islamic laws and norms and are considered as a sin (Azumah 116). Therefore, the act of sin does not exist in a state of being since people commit transgressions through their actions. However, to eliminate the state of sin Muslims believe that salvation is ensued and becomes the last phase of a believers life, and its final reward is entering paradise (Azumah 152). In Islam, those who die nonbelievers will not be saved, nor will they attain the gift of entering heaven. However, those who die believing in Allah but disregarding the Islamic message will be left at God’s mercies. On the other hand, the Buddhists religion does not believe in sin since it is seen as ignorant instead of trespass (Wolff 73). However, Buddhists are convinced by in the idea of Karma with every action resulting in particular consequences (Maitreya 14). Therefore, one’s intentions lead to one acting right or wrong. Due to the nonexistence of sin, Buddhists take salvation as liberation from egoistic and subconsciously instilled forces within an individual. Meditating on the eightfold path of salvation, a Buddhist can seek and achieve the total redemptive state.

There is significant difference seen in both religions where sin is associated Muslims believe in sin, while in Buddhism, this concept is nonexistent. In Islam, sin is expressed differently, including transgressions, immorality, wickedness, mistakes, witchcraft, and injustice (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 11). Buddhists do not believe in sin at all. Instead, they live with the cause-effect understanding since all the actions of an individual are considered as either leading to the merits or demerits to oneself. In the Islamic faith, God is said to punish all wrongdoers, and his anger is as furious as the fires of hell (Owolabi et al. 18). Indeed, that is why the Sharia laws are there to describe how a person’s sin can be atoned with consideration of their intensities. Buddhists do not believe in God’s atonement. Instead, their religion focuses on the atonement between human beings. Therefore, hatred, greed, and delusion are avoided through compassion, kindness, and sympathy.

However, both religions are similar in that they believe sin is forgivable. Muslims are convinced with the ideas that Allah has mercy, and He forgives after a genuine repentance. Similarly, Buddhists believe in forgiveness, but only fellow human beings have the power to atone the sins of the wrongdoers in this religion (Wolff 80). For that reason, Buddha teachings evolve around believing in change. In Buddhism, forgiveness and accommodation is required amongst believers since Buddha believes that a corrupt person can turn away from doing evil and sets forth on a right path.

Regarding the idea of salvation, Buddhists and Islamic faiths understand that it is the final course. Both religions differ in that Buddhists believe that salvation is a personal journey prompted by recurrent cycles of suffering and rebirth (Maitreya 14). For that reason, liberating oneself from those cycles require individual mediation and understanding of oneself without the help of any other person. On the other hand, the Islamic religion insists that everyone lives under the mercies of Allah as He is the only God who can offer salvation to a person. Therefore, whereas some people do not receive salvation, others are left to God’s willingness to forgive them, while some believers are saved and will live in paradise with Allah.

Both religions are similar in the aspect that before one can fully attain salvation, there is the need to follow a particular path. In the Buddhist religion, the quest for salvation is achieved through the Eightfold Path of Buddha (Wolff 85). Through these paths, a believer attains Nirvana, which is explained as the annihilation of one’s ego to attain wisdom (Dhammanada 10). Each path is attributed to nurturing a remarkable Buddhist path to salvation. Lastly, an individual becomes wise through attaining the rights and precise understanding. Similarly, in the Islamic beliefs, the deeds and faith of a believer determine if Allah will save a person (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 12). Hence, there are five major principles that an individual is required to follow to attain salvation. The first one is testifying Allah as the true God, and then ensuring to partake in compulsory prayers. In addition, salvation is guaranteed if a person offers charity and alms to those who are disadvantaged or needy in society, and ensures to make a pilgrimage visit to the holy city of Mecca. Lastly, salvation in Islam is assured if a person faithfully partakes in fasting on the holy months of Ramadan.

Meaning of Faith and the Role of Death

The concept of faith has always been considered as an important aspect of every religion. In Islam, faith refers to fully observance of Allah’s teaching, learning each of them, and confirming that one’s heart believes in those teachings (Azumah 28). Therefore, faith not only requires a belief but is also propagated by a firm knowledge and commitment to act as Allah wants without doubt or fear. Islam proclaims that one’s faith acts as one factor Allah uses to distinguish between believers and non-believers. With this kind of faith the Islamic religion takes death as a gift from Allah (Azumah 127). Each believer is taught to wait for this day as Muslims believe only God lives forever since all other creatures will eventually perish through death. That is why Buddhists translate faith as an ability to live confidently and truthfully. Due to the self-realization of faith, Buddhists consider death a conditioned factor in the life cycle of a person’s existence on earth. However, Buddhism provides that death is one factor that contributes to the suffering of a human being during their life. Buddhists also believe that death is a one-phase cycle that is seen as passing away, and it is inevitable.

On death issues, the core similarity in both religions is the acknowledgment that dying is an inevitable phase in life for every mortal creature. Muslims believe this step is unavoidable as it provides a path for a believer to go and meet with his or her creator. Therefore, death calls for celebration in the Islamic religion as a well-cultivated relationship between the dead person and Allah in one’s lifetime guarantee salvation shortly after dying. Similarly, Buddhists believe death is a human predicament that liberates a person’s soul (Wolff 78). Therefore, death is inevitable, and instead of denying it, believers should learn to confront it realistically and intelligently (Dhammanada 14). For that reason, people prepare for death through technicalities like those of intense where one learns to control and achieve freedom of life, both in the present and future.

 However, both religions differ in their beliefs in the form a person takes after death. According to Islam, a believer retains the physical body, which resurrects on judgment day. As such, Muslims are buried with a lot of care since during the judgment day, their physical bodies will reappear for Allah to decide who goes to hell and who goes to paradise. On the other hand, Buddhists are non-believers of souls and believe that after death, one’s physical body eventually perishes during this stage of life (Maitreya 15). According to Buddhists, only the karma of a person survives death and is later transmitted to another physical person, thus facilitating reincarnation.

As per faith matters, there are differing concepts in both religions where Muslims believe in Allah as the creator and have hope in him, while Buddhism refutes the existence of trust in another supernatural being. Buddhism believers are taught to understand that no higher God or priest can interfere with another person’s faith (Maitreya 14). Therefore, Buddha’s teachings purport that even his followers should not have confidence in him as he has no power to save anyone, nor no supreme being is above the law of karma.

On the other hand, the Islamic religion constructs its faith on several articles. The first article is Allah as the supreme God, followed by His angels, who are God’s Messengers (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 11). Secondly, there are revelations in the Quran and renowned Allah’s prophets whose main work was to teach people in the past as they were specifically ordained to deliver God’s messages. Resurrection and the Day of Judgment are also articles of faith in Islam, as they are when believers and non-believers will receive their rewards from Allah. God’s divine will is the last article of belief in Allah, as it is used to measure the right or wrong of a person.

For Buddha followers, faith exists as a person’s spiritual refuge. Through this consciousness, people are convicted of their actions, but their confidence is awakened to facilitate self-realization in individuals (Dhammanada 17). Similarly, Islamic faith is also a form of refuge for believers where they are promised of ultimate progress and success throughout their earthly life, while non-believers are assured of disillusionment and failure for refusal to cultivate their faith in Allah.

The Nature of Morality

Essentially, morality is a vital concept that reflects in all domains of life, inclusive of the religious platforms. In Buddhism, moral principles are used to evaluate the extent to which a person’s actions through body language or speech can harm oneself or others within society. As such, nurturing a skilled mind is one of the core activities expounded in the Buddha’s teachings (Dhammanada 4). Islam is also deeply rooted in moral living as the original creed of believing in one God: Allah leads the way (Azumah). Therefore, to ensure that a person lives an honest, harmonious, and a purposeful life, Muslims look up to the Quran and the teachings of the traditional prophets to help them live and achieve peace in the world or life after death. The similarity between the morality concept in Islam and Buddhism is that both religions derive their moral authority from the Quran and the Dharma doctrines. The laws outlined on the Dharma are necessary ethical guidance, which are essential in freeing Buddha believers from suffering and ensuring that human values are upgraded (Dhammanada 22). However, Dharma goes beyond the Buddha’s teachings as they encompass understanding the nature of a person’s mind, body, and worldly conditions. Notably, it is due to this realization that Buddhists live in a realistic way that interrelates with their existence.

Consequently, the morality concept in the Quran insists that Muslims should uphold moral character traits of individual and societal grounds. The Quran’s guiding principle in a person’s behavior insists on Al’amal Assalih, that expects each believer to have virtuous deeds, which serve as outward and inwards acts of worship. From the Quran, acting morally, as society requires, facilitates in strengthening a community, thus ensuring the moral health of the entire Islamic framework (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 12). However, both religions differ in the moral obligations, especially in the concept of injuring animals or other human beings. From the Quran, Islamic believers are allowed to undertake jihad activities and ensure to fight alongside other Muslims for the good of the entire society (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 12). On the other hand, Buddhists are morally obligated to prevent injury to any living creature (Wolff 76). Therefore, all kinds of weapons are cast aside to ensure that no living thing is deprived of the chance to live an entirely happy life.

Conclusion

From the above discussion, it is clear that both Muslims and Buddhist have well-nurtured religious beliefs. According to Buddhism, sin is forgivable but nonexistent in this religion based on the aspect of atonement that can clear away a person’s sinful nature. In Islam, sin is existent, atoned by Allah, and is forgivable through genuine repentance. In salvation, Buddhists believe that the Eightfold Path cultivates the way to salvation but disregards the idea of life after death (Maitreya et al. 6). Subsequently, Islam believes in Allah’s salvation, which is developed through practicing the five major Islamic principles.

The death concept, according to Buddhism, is inevitable and does not require a person’s physical body to reincarnate. Similarly, Muslims agree that death is a conditioned predicament that joyfully fulfills the life of a character after dying, while the physical form of a person is necessary as it will resurrect during the Day of Judgment. Faith in Buddhism is nonexistent, but self-realization and propagation of one’s conscience are essential in convicting and offering confidence to Buddha believers. On the other hand, Muslims have faith in Allah and other articles designed to enhance their beliefs, which act as pillars of refuge for progress and success in the world. As per morality and its nature, the Islamic religion follows the sharia laws but allows the perpetuation of wars and injuries on human beings or other living creatures. However, Buddhists are led by Dharma doctrines where the believers are morally obligated to uphold the right to life and avoid injuring any creature at all cost.

Introduction

Religious concepts differ significantly; various people and communities explain them using different approaches. Therefore, religious communities offer value systems and worldviews that are unacceptable by other people with different beliefs. Indeed, it becomes difficult for people to understand the belief systems of other communities as the inadequacy of this comprehension results in a hasty judgment that reflects significant arrogance and ignorance. Essentially, each religion defines its values and opinions differently. Significant alterations are seen in religious scripture, doctrines, customs, practices, and rituals. Nonetheless, it is essential to note that there are some exciting similarities seen and rejoiced by different religions and thus the need to celebrate them (Maitreya 10). In essence, taking a closer look at the differences in religious beliefs is essential as it is through them that misunderstandings are developed, and if not remedied, small issues can lead to other bigger problems. While religion does not always initiate intense problems, looking into the major differences between beliefs is important, as it is core in resolving various issues resulting from religious affiliations. Therefore, it is imperative to discuss major concepts of religion in Buddhism and Islam to evaluate the existing similarities and differences between the two groups of worshippers.

The Concept of Sin

In all faiths, sin is a vital concept that substantially determines the godliness of a person. According to Muslims, all actions that do not reflect Allah’s commands are against the Islamic laws and norms and considered a sin (Azumah 116). Therefore, the act of sin does not exist in a state of being since people commit transgressions through their actions.

On the other hand, the Buddhists religion does not believe in sin since it is seen as ignorant instead of trespass (Wolff 73). However, Buddhists believe in the idea of Karma, with every action resulting in particular consequences (Maitreya 14). Therefore, one’s intentions lead either into one acting in a right or wrong way. The significant difference in both religions is that Muslims believe in sin, while this concept is nonexistent in Buddhism. In Islam, sins are expressed in different ways, including of transgressions, immorality, wickedness, mistakes, witchcraft, injustice, among other vices (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 11).

Buddhists do not believe in sin at all. Instead, they live with the cause-effect understanding since all the actions of an individual are considered as either leading to the merits or demerits to oneself. In the Islamic faith, God is said to punish all wrongdoers, and his anger is as furious as the fires of hell (Owolabi et al. 18). Indeed, that is why the Sharia laws are there to describe how a person’s sin can be atoned with consideration of their intensities. Buddhists do not believe in God’s atonement. Instead, their religion focuses on the atonement between human beings. Therefore, hatred, greed, and delusion are avoided through compassion, kindness, and sympathy.

However, both religions are similar in that they believe sin is forgivable. Muslims believe that Allah has mercy and He forgives after a genuine repentance. Similarly, Buddhists believe in forgiveness, but only fellow human beings have the power to atone the sins of the wrongdoers in this religion (Wolff 80). For that reason, Buddha teachings evolve around believing in change. In Buddhism, forgiveness and accommodation is required amongst believers since Buddha believes that a corrupt person can turn away from doing evil and sets forth on a right path.

Meaning and Method of Salvation

Buddhism and Islam are rooted in understanding salvation and its final course. According to Buddhists, salvation is referred to as liberation from egoistic and subconsciously instilled forces within an individual. The Islamic religion maintains that salvation is the last stage in the life of a believer, and its final reward is entering paradise (Azumah 152). Both religions differ in that Buddhists believe that salvation is a personal journey that is prompted by recurrent cycles of suffering and rebirth (Maitreya 14). For that reason, liberating oneself from those cycles require individual mediation and understanding of oneself without the help of any other person. On the other hand, the Islamic religion insists that everyone lives under the mercies of Allah as he is the only God who can offer salvation to a person. Therefore, whereas some people do not receive salvation, others are left to God’s willingness to forgive them, while some believers are saved and will live in paradise with Allah.

Both religions are similar in the aspect that before one can fully attain salvation, there is need to follow a particular path. In the Buddhist religion, the quest for salvation is achieved through the Eightfold Path of Buddha (Wolff 85). Through these paths, a believer attains Nirvana, which is explained as the annihilation of one’s ego to attain wisdom (Dhammanada 10). Each path is attributed to nurturing a remarkable Buddhist path to salvation. In fact, that is why the right actions, livelihood, and rational speech result in morality, which is the first step towards salvation. Then a person cultivates concentration through right mindfulness, right concentration, and right effort. Lastly, an individual becomes wise through attaining the rights and precise understanding. Similarly, in the Islamic beliefs, the deeds and faith of a believer determine if Allah will save a person (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 12). Hence, there are five major principles that a person is required to follow to attain salvation. The first one is testifying Allah as the true God, and then ensuring to partake in compulsory prayers. In addition, salvation is guaranteed if a person offers charity and alms to those who are disadvantaged or needy in society and ensuring to make a pilgrimage visit to the holy city of Mecca. Lastly, salvation in Islam is assured if a person faithfully partakes in fasting on the holy months of Ramadan.

Meaning of Death

In Buddhism, death is considered a conditioned factor in the life cycle of a person’s existence on earth. Therefore, Buddhists believe that death is one factor that contributes to the suffering of a human being during their life. In the Islamic view, death is translated as a gift from Allah (Azumah 127). Therefore, each believer is taught to wait for this day, as Muslims believe that only God lives forever since all other creatures will eventually perish through death.

The core similarity in both religions is the acknowledgment that death is an inevitable phase in life for every mortal creature. Muslims believe this step is unavoidable as it provides a path for a believer to go and meet with his or her creator. Therefore, death calls for celebration in the Islamic religion as a well-cultivated relationship between the dead person and Allah in one’s lifetime guarantee salvation shortly after dying. Similarly, Buddhists believe that death is a human predicament that provides liberation for a person’s soul (Wolff 78). Therefore, death is inevitable, and instead of denying it, believers should learn to confront it realistically and intelligently (Dhammanada 14). For that reason, people prepare for death through technicalities like those of intense where one learns to control and achieve freedom of life, both in the present and future

 However, both religions differ in their beliefs of the form a person takes after death. According to Islam, believers retain the physical body, which resurrects on judgment day. As such, Muslims are buried with a lot of care because during the judgment day, their physical bodies will reappear for Allah to decide who goes to hell and who goes to paradise. On the other hand, Buddhists are non-believers of souls and believe that after death, one’s physical body eventually perishes during this stage of life (Maitreya 15). According to Buddhists, only the karma of a person survives death and is later transmitted to another physical person, thus facilitating reincarnation.

The Role of Faith

The concept of faith has always been considered as an important aspect of every religion. In Islam, faith refers to fully observance of Allah’s teaching, learning each of them, and confirming that one’s heart believes in those teachings (Azumah 28). Therefore, faith requires a belief and is propagated by a firm knowledge and commitment to act as Allah wants without doubt or fear. According to Buddhists, faith is explained as the initial acceptance of the existence of Buddha and his teachings. Nonetheless, Buddhism teaches the importance of attaining self-realization of spiritual truth by oneself. In essence, the faith concept in both religions differs in that Muslims believe in Allah as the creator and have hope in him, while Buddhism refutes the existence of trust in another supernatural being. Buddhism believers are taught to understand that no higher God or priest can interfere with another person’s faith (Maitreya 14). For that reason, Buddha’s teachings purport that even his followers should not have confidence in him as he has no power to save anyone, nor no supreme being is above the law of karma.

On the other hand, the Islamic religion constructs its faith on several articles. The first article is Allah as the supreme God, followed by His angels, who are God’s Messengers (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 11). Secondly, there are revelations in the Quran and renowned Allah’s prophets whose main work was to teach people in the past as they were specifically ordained to deliver God’s messages. Resurrection and the Day of Judgment are also articles of faith in Islam, as they are the days when believers and non-believers will receive their rewards from Allah. God’s divine will is the last article of belief in Allah as it is used to measure the right or wrong of a person.

For Buddha followers, faith exists in the form of a person’s spiritual refuge. Through this consciousness, people are convicted of their actions, but their confidence is awakened to facilitate self-realization in individuals (Dhammanada 17). Similarly, Islamic faith is also a form of refuge for believers where they are promised of ultimate progress and success throughout their earthly life, while non-believers are assured of disillusionment and failure for refusal to cultivate their faith in Allah.

The Nature of Morality

Essentially, morality is a vital concept that reflects in all domains of life,, inclusive of the religious platforms. In Buddhism, moral principles are used to evaluate the extent to which a person’s actions through body language or speech can pose harm to either oneself or others within society. As such, nurturing a skilled mind is one of the core activities expounded in the Buddha’s teachings (Dhammanada 4). Islam is also deeply rooted in moral living as the original creed of believing in one God; Allah leads the way (Azumah). Therefore, to ensure that a person lives an honest, harmonious, and a purposeful life, Muslims look up to the Quran and the teachings of the traditional prophets to help them live and achieve peace in the world or life after death. The similarity between the morality concept in Islam and Buddhism is that both religions derive their moral authority from the Quran and the Dharma doctrines. The laws outlined on the Dharma are necessary ethical guidance, which are essential in freeing Buddha believers from suffering and ensuring that human values are upgraded (Dhammanada 22). However, Dharma goes beyond the Buddha’s teachings as they encompass understanding the nature of a person’s mind, body, and worldly conditions. Notably, it is due to this realization that Buddhists live in a realistic way that interrelates with their existence.

Consequently, the morality concept in the Quran insists that Muslims should uphold moral character traits of individual and societal grounds. The Quran’s guiding principle in a person’s behavior insists on Al’amal Assalih, that expects each believer to have virtuous deeds, which serve as outward and inwards acts of worship. From the Quran, acting morally as society requires facilitates strengthening a community, thus ensuring the moral health of the Islamic framework (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 12). However, both religions differ in the moral obligations, especially in the concept of injuring animals or other human beings. From the Quran, Islamic believers are allowed to undertake jihad activities and ensure to fight alongside other Muslims for the good of the entire society (The Islamic Bulletin Staff 12). On the other hand, Buddhists are morally obligated to prevent injury to any living creature (Wolff 76). Therefore, all kinds of weapons are cast aside to ensure that no living thing is deprived the chance to live an entirely happy life.

Conclusion

From the above discussion, it is clear that both Muslims and Buddhist have well nurtured religious beliefs. According to Buddhism, sin is forgivable but nonexistent in this religion based on the aspect of atonement that can clear away a person’s sinful nature. In Islam, sin is existent, atoned by Allah, and is forgivable through genuine repentance. In salvation, Buddhists believe that the Eightfold Path cultivates the way to salvation but disregards the idea of life after death (Maitreya et al. 6). Subsequently, Islam believes in Allah’s salvation, which is developed through practicing the five major Islamic principles. The death concept, according to Buddhism, is inevitable and does not require a person’s physical body to reincarnate.

Similarly, Muslims agree that death is a conditioned predicament that joyfully fulfills the life of a character after dying, while the physical form of a person is necessary as it will resurrect during the Day of Judgment. Faith in Buddhism is nonexistent, but self-realization and propagation of one’s conscience are essential in convicting and offering confidence to Buddha believers. On the other hand, Muslims have faith in Allah and other articles designed to enhance their beliefs, which act as pillars of refuge for progress and success in the world. As per morality and its nature, the Islamic religion follows the sharia laws but allows the perpetuation of wars and injuries on human beings or other living creatures. However, Buddhists are led by Dharma doctrines where the believers are morally obligated to uphold the right to life and avoid injuring any creature at all cost.

 

Works Cited

Azumah, John A. My Neighbour’s Faith: Islam Explained for African Christians. Hippo Books, 2008.

Dhammanada, S. K. Buddhism as a Religion. Buddha Dharma Education Association Inc. 1994, pp. 1-29.

Maitreya, A, B, Maharatthaguru, A, T, M, D Litt, D, P, A, and Gomes J. Introducing Buddhism. Buddhist Group of Kendal (Theravada). 2003, pp. 1-28.

Owolabi, A, J, Adekoya, S, J, and Adewale, O. A. common Themes in Christianity and Islam. National Open University of Nigeria. 2008, pp. 1-92.

The Islamic Bulletin Staff. “Islam Beliefs and Practices.” The Islamic Bulletin. (2009), vol. no. 24, pp. 1-31.

Wolff, Richard. The Popular Encyclopedia of World Religions. Eugene, Harvest House Publishers, 2007.

Calculate your order
Pages (275 words)
Standard price: $0.00
Client Reviews
4.9
Sitejabber
4.6
Trustpilot
4.8
Our Guarantees
100% Confidentiality
Information about customers is confidential and never disclosed to third parties.
Original Writing
We complete all papers from scratch. You can get a plagiarism report.
Timely Delivery
No missed deadlines – 97% of assignments are completed in time.
Money Back
If you're confident that a writer didn't follow your order details, ask for a refund.

Calculate the price of your order

You will get a personal manager and a discount.
We'll send you the first draft for approval by at
Total price:
$0.00
Power up Your Academic Success with the
Team of Professionals. We’ve Got Your Back.
Power up Your Study Success with Experts We’ve Got Your Back.
error: Content is protected !!
Open chat
1
Order through WhatsApp!
nursingesssayswritings.com
Hello!
You Can Now Place your Order through WhatsApp

Order your essay today and save 15% with the discount code ESSAYHELP23